Independent Régence is a unique permanent exhibition space located in Brussels that supports the programs of Independent's extended gallery network throughout the year. Galleries are invited to curate a special exhibition at Régence to highlight artists from their program. Independent Régence offers a platform and support to exhibiting galleries and artist to allow them to focus on curating the show.

Open to the public, Wednesday – Saturdays, 12–6pm

Sarah Meyohas

Cloud of Petals

April 27 - June 17
Opening Reception: April 27, 6 - 9 PM

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Sarah Meyohas
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Sarah Meyohas
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis


Petals cannot digitize themselves. Human hands must individually open the flower, pick the petal, place it under the lens, press the shutter, and upload the image to the cloud. Then again, and again, and again.

In August 2016, 10,000 roses were placed in the atrium of the former Bell Labs. The work of photographing the individual petals and turning them into a dataset was performed by sixteen men. The digital images of petals, all one hundred thousand, were used as inputs for an artificial neural network which learned to generate new, unique petals forever.

From this performance results the 30 minute film Cloud of Petals on display, alongside an installation of photographs.

In defiance of two brokerage firms closing her accounts, Sarah Meyohas will also present a new painting from her Stock Performance series.

Meyohas trades on the New York Stock Exchange, placing orders with the purpose of visual change. Once she affects a stock’s valuation, Meyohas announces the change in market capitalization and records the shift with oil stick. Marks accumulate in a gestural record of the stock’s performance. The line, value over time, is an index of her movement, physically in the gallery and virtually in her ownership. Each painting is one of many financial records, but unique as an artwork.

Following her Stock Performance at 303 Gallery, Charles Schwab and TD Ameritrade cancelled her brokerage accounts without explanation. To commemorate this event, the letters have been engraved into crystal awards. The trophies are on display for their inaugural viewing.

BIOGRAPHY

In her work across media, Sarah Meyohas (French-American, born 1991) uses networks of information, power, value, and communication. Most spaces are shaped by the flow of desire through matrices of thought; this is the site of her work.

Her 2015 cryptocurrency Bitchcoin and recent Stock Performance at 303 Gallery in New York have been featured in The New York Times, Time Magazine, Wired, Vice, Fortune, Artspace, and The Atlantic, and she has appeared on CNBC, PBS, and CBC. She recently been selected for the Forbes 30 Under 30 list.

Meyohas holds a B.A. in international relations from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.S. in finance from the Wharton School, and in 2015 received an M.F.A. from Yale University. Her home in New York is her eponymously named gallery.

DARJA BAJAGIĆ & ISSY WOOD

14 March – 23 April 2017

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

Darja Bajagic and Issy Wood, presented by Carlos/Ishikawa
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis


At Régence, Bajagić will show a new group of collages, as well as Nobody Knows I’m Funny (Bianca Brust, Maddy O’ Reilly, Kali Michaels). In this work, Kali and Maddy’s heads exist as the faces of Comedy and Tragedy, touching upon Bianca’s story and her love affair with Matthias Schooremann from black metal band Carpe Noctem. Schooremann murdered and decapitated Bianca after she attempted to break off their relationship, then photographed Bianca’s body and head in different poses before posting the images on an online gore forum. Schooremann later committed suicide by crashing his car, with Bianca’s head in the passenger seat, zipped up in a backpack. The images of Bianca were taken down by Schoormann before he committed suicide, but had already been absorbed by the internet and disseminated online in various different sites. The heads are framed in a Celtic border, an ancient religious pattern appropriated by predominantly male white supremacist groups. The work is accompanied by a small publication where Bajagić has copied-and-pasted a comments thread in reply to the set of images of Bianca posted on the Best Gore website.

Darja Bajagić’s (b.1990, Podgorica, ME) works adopt strategies of shifting contexts in order to complicate the consumption of images, momentarily deactivating fixed judgements and leaving images open to ulterior connections to free up meaning. Bajagić’s works concede to the tensions between fascination and revulsion, pleasure and disgust, and to the redemptive quality of humour in light of the heinous. “Bajagić might be less interested in the accountability of images than the driving need to make them so”.

Issy Wood (b.1993, North Carolina, USA) works primarily in painting and in text. Though her writing mostly takes place under wraps, it serves as a kind of quiet script for the paintings' resultant scenes. In image making Wood probes ideas of drama, gender, physique and costume, finding the horror and the humdrum in everything from Pointillism to Sex and the City.

Most of the bodies in question fall just short of proper historical or sexual identity, instead appearing smothered with jewellery or ornaments in and of themselves.

displacement (prologue)

26 January – 4 March 2017

Giovanni Anselmo - stanley brouwn - André Cadere - Peter Downsbrough - Runo Lagomarsino - Basim Magdy - Charlotte Moth

Curated by Lilou Vidal - Bureau des Réalités

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

displacement (prologue)

Installation view 'displacement (prologue)', Independent Régence, 2017
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis


“Displacement (prologue)” functions as a prelude to a series of projects initiated by Bureau des Réalités throughout its 2017 traveling program abroad. This foreword constitutes the impetus to various approaches around issues of displacement. Its multiple definitions reflect its plural essence (action, geography, economy, politics, physics, chemistry, geometry, psychoanalysis, etc.).

Aside from its first nature that derives from the laws of physics and the movement of a body in space, it would be tempting to retrace the exciting textual anthology of displacement from the first narratives on sailing and voyages to Rousseau’s “Reveries of a solitary walker”, Nietzsche’s walks, as well as the rambles of the nineteenth century (Woolf, Poe, Baudelaire), or the wanderings of Rimbaud, Perec and Debord, to name but a few, but this, however, is not the topic at hand.

As a vector, sign, mechanism and consequence, displacement lies at the heart of any form of process. The history of modern art carries within itself the desire to free the artwork from its static materiality and turn art into a vital experience. In today’s globalized world, it has become a way of life and a societal reality.

This prologue aims to highlight the different approaches addressed since the late 60s and early 70s by a selection of emblematic figures of Conceptual Art and a younger generation of artists with heterogeneous methods that have chosen displacement as their source or subject of reflection.

Walkers, urban nomads, modern pilgrims – Giovanni Anselmo, stanley brouwn, and André Cadere each have, in their own way, created normative and sensitive systems to measure both the body and the object in tangible and infinite space so as to fathom the immeasurability of our presence in the universe.

The exhibition does not, as such, articulate itself as a group exhibition, but rather as a conglomerate of individual and complementary paths – leading from the teachings of Conceptual Art to a free and open approach to what displacement may be in its current understanding and form, while also revealing social and migratory issues.

Extract from the text of Lilou Vidal, "Displacement (prologue)"

Time Lines: Ryan Gander, Cally Spooner, Mark Geffriaud

October 27– December 17, 2016

As part of the show, performances will be held at Independent Régence:

November 26, 2016 | Mark Geffriaud, deux mille quinze (2016) 

December 10, 2016 | Cally Spooner, Tough Kid, Full Out. True Pro. Get Better, Rest Up, Strange Night but…Proud (2014-2015)

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The exhibition Time Lines features three artists of different nationalities and backgrounds re-presented by gb agency, all of whose work emerges from a common use of concepts by associations of ideas or varied readings. Time is thus essential in the development of the creative process, allowing their work to blossom with slow maturation.

British artist Cally Spooner developed her project "And You Were Wonderful, On Stage", originally as a performance for the Stedelijk Museum, the Tate Modern and Performa in New York over a two year period. One of the sources used by the artist for the production of this work is the book of the philosopher Bernard Stiegler "For a new critique of Political Economy" in which he examines our relationship to technology and its impact on our use of language. The artist chooses to use "technical failures" of celebrities such as Beyonce, Lance Armstrong or politician Michael Gove who, each in a moment of their career, have perverted language in its use, and lied to the public. The slow construction of the piece has grown from elements of their language and comments of outraged and disappointed youtubers, then rearranged by the artist in a libretto used for the performance and later for the final work which consists of an installation with 5 films. The personal experience of the artist, who for a period of time was a writer in an advertising agency, is also part of this creative process. She sometimes had to tap into the personal experiences of employees in order to transform into advertising slogan "serving" the company. "And You Were Wonderful, On Stage" shows bodies performing, bodies under pressure in the workspace, in sports or on stage.

The work of Mark Geffriaud often reflects upon the notion of time, showing us objects symbolizing its passage. "Sleeper 1" functions as a transformative portrait of a section of a rail of the High Line in NY. The artist, through carbon 14 technology, has converted a wooden rail section into graphite powder, exposing the structure. Encapsulated within "Sleeper 1", the graphite powder is protected from UV light, and is the embodiment of the history of Bell Laboratories in New York, who pioneered scientific discoveries that have forever changed the way we communicate.

The rhythm in "Auto" gives the exhibition tempo in a hypnotic movement. This machine created by mathematician Claude Shannon who shuts off on its own with a disturbingly simple mechanism but nevertheless recalls the information theory invented by Shannon in the same Bell Labs in 1948. This established communication in terms of "bits" of information, and in binary code. The REEL series represents various documents photographed on the same white wall, that of the artist's studio. These photos, newspaper articles or sheets of paper, change and evolve over time, based on the artist’s research and interest. They form elements of a film projected on the wall of his studio, like a multitude of frames moving in the time of thought and creation of the artist.

Ryan Gander's work is devised according to his mind in perpetual search and questioning. Free associations from everyday life anecdotes, settings, or the artist’s specific interest such as design and architecture intertwine and meet over time, during the development of a work constantly changing. The viewer’s imagination in front of a work by Ryan Gander is perpetually being tested around recurring themes. His work is often in an in-between, a hard to define space, one that gives birth to creativity, like a child enthralled by ordinary things with an eagerness constantly renewed. Thus Associative Sequel or Associative Photograph connecting various and a priori heterogeneous elements or the fake black ball artificially suspended in space, or of these lamps originally designed for his wife which consist of the assembly of objects from DIY stores, turning them into fragile sculptures of surprising colors and shapes. "And you will be changed" is a video showing Emma Lavigne, curator of the Pierre Huyghe retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, leading a ghost tour of the exhibition in the now empty space of the Galerie Sud where it was staged. Thanks to a precise description of Pierre Huyghe’s artworks, the viewer is transported into a new space-time, that of the imaginary past exhibition.

MARK BARROW & SARAH PARKE AT INDEPENDENT RÉGENCE

PRESENTED BY ELIZABETH DEE GALLERY & ALMINE RECH GALLERY

September 8 – October 22, 2016

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'Matter of Time' courtesy of Independent Regence
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Elizabeth Dee Gallery and Almine Rech Gallery. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis


Elizabeth Dee and Almine Rech Gallery are pleased to announce Matter of Time a project by

Mark Barrow and Sarah Parke at Independent Régence, Brussels.

The artists continue their exploration of the intersection between textiles, painting, and digital media with a selection of objects, a site-specific installation, and a video. The project draws a correlation between textiles as busywork[1] and time as a human-constructed metaphor that governs our relationship to objects and the universe around them.

In V838 Mon images taken by the Hubble telescope from 2002-2006 of a star that exploded over 20,000 years ago are manipulated pixel by pixel to create a 12 second animation that loops continuously. As the star explodes the pixels reveal an underlying pattern that is the same design used for fabrics in some of the paintings in the exhibition. A frame from the video is reproduced with colored film squares and installed on the skylight between the second and first floor galleries. The stained glass mosaic and the video create physical embodiments of the exploding star that translate the light traveling through space after the initial event into colored pixels moving across a screen.

Also on view are a trio of paintings whose compositions are representations of Barrow’s finger movements on an iPad. Painted by following the individual threads of Parke’s underlying woven fabric, the compositions are thus a representation of Parke’s hand/foot movements as well. As objects, the paintings serve as a record of the artists’ actions over a given period of time. Two paintings, Phase I and Phase II, from an ongoing series of sewn canvases using a changing circular motif emphasize the relationship of space, time, and thinking between works. And in the second floor gallery, a selection of the artists’ Reweaves is on display that questions those relationships. The Reweaves are created by staining plain-woven linen, pulling the fabric apart thread by thread, and reweaving those threads into two paintings with new patterns (one from the warp and one from the weft). Though the process links two paintings, each painting is unique and they are not a diptych. In fact, they are exhibited at times as pairs and at times individually. This affront to originality perhaps points to alternate models of understanding a painting similar to how things in the field of physics like comingled particles, non-locality, and inflationary theory may point to new understandings of space, time, and objects in our universe.

[1] An activity undertaken to pass time and stay busy but in and of itself has no intrinsic value

“AUTOLYSIS” BY ASIM WAQIF & "THE DROSTE EFFECT" GROUP SHOW

Presented by Nature Morte, New Delhi

19 April - 28 May 2016

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis


In Gallery One: "Autolysis” by Asim Waqif On display will be a group of works made by the artist Asim Waqif for an exhibition in New Delhi this past January entitled “Autolysis.” The title refers to the breakdown of plant or animal tissues by enzymes that are present in the tissues themselves; “self-digestion” would be an apt synonym. Waqif has, for many years, fused part of his artistic practice with chemistry, allowing works to be determined through decay, abuse, and the vicissitudes of time, his most recent such engagement with the poetics of detritus being his site-specific installation at the Asia Pacific Triennale 8 at the Queensland Art Gallery of Brisbane, entitled “All we leave behind are the memories,” a monumental assemblage of reclaimed timber from demolition sites around the city, resulting in an interactive electronic and acoustic construction. ‘I am trying to promote situations and processes of decay and abuse to explore vulnerability and risk,’ says Waqif, who found himself strongly motivated to pursue the ephemeral possibilities of a work of art to subvert the market’s consumptive zeal for permanent or durable objects. ‘While installing a bamboo installation in a garden in Mumbai the art collectors were very concerned about the longevity of the artwork. They said, “We want it to be available to our grand-children,” adding “Can’t you make it out of concrete?”’ explains Waqif, who was appalled by the suggestion, considering the use of bamboo was the premise of his project. ‘I realized over time that the art market was obsessed with the archivability of artworks.’ The works constituting “Autolysis” are the consequence of Waqif’s intense three-month long interaction with the historic site adjoining the Qutab Minar in New Delhi, a 200-year-old sarai that has not been used for decades. Located in the archaeological area that was once host to one of the seven ancient cities of Delhi, the exhibition was the result of Waqif’s understanding of and collaboration with its historicity. On display will be sculptures and photographic works, which mix both fabricated and organic materials, many of which were collected on the site of the “Autolysis” exhibition in Delhi. Elements are subjected to chemicals, left to decompose, and violently manipulated, mirroring the artist’s subjects of half-demolished architecture and abandoned domestic settings. Thick coats of high- gloss polyurethane arrest any further changes and seal the surfaces of rotten and soiled art works.

In Galleries Two and Three: “The Droste Effect” Nature Morte will present a group show on the subject of the continued relevance of the Readymade in artistic practice, this as Duchamp’s “Fountain” reaches its centenary. Floating within the abyss (mise en abyme), we find pictures of images increasingly accelerated within a recursive circularity. The Readymade and the appropriated image converge within a space of minimal manipulation, object and image become indistinguishable from one another, and the political economy of the sign defies any critique. Placed between two mirrors (history and commerce?), the art work ricochets on itself, arriving at infinitude, a black hole of mimesis that retains no allegiance to origins. In this heightened state of apprehension we might be approaching something akin to the logic of the Symbolists, who coveted “perceptible surfaces created to represent their esoteric affinities with the primordial ideals.” (Jean Moreas, Symbolist Manifesto, 1886) Not unlike Richard Prince’s “the unreal real of the real thing” which he describes in his book Why I Go to the Movies Alone (Tanam Press, 1983). Artists in the exhibition from India will include: Subodh Gupta, Pushpamala N., Thukral & Tagra, Jitish Kallat, Atul Dodiya, Anita Dube, Seher Shah, and Dayanita Singh. To be joined by their international peers including Jacques Villegle, Faig Ahmed, Alain Bublex, Anotonio Santin, and Daniel Dezeuze.

IAN BREAKWELL: ONE BY ONE: YEAR BY YEAR: A CONCISE HISTORY
Presented by Anthony Reynolds Gallery


24 October – 12 December 2015

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Installation view, Independent Régence, 2015
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view, Independent Régence, 2015
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view, Independent Régence, 2015
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

Breakwell was a great polymath artist with a roll-call of heart-and-soul-mates that included James Joyce and Robert Walser, Schubert and Thelonius Monk, Goya and Magritte, Ingmar Bergman and Buster Keaton, and who, in the words of Felicity Sparrow, was ‘the champion of the underdog. The unseen, the unloved. And the unlovely.

He was and is a unique and hugely influential figure, one of the greatest exponents of the visual language of word and text. Surrealism, Letterism, Fluxus, Happenings, Systems, chance and order are all part of his make-up. Out of these and his working class Midlands background Breakwell fashioned a brilliant and utterly singular oeuvre. He was a diarist, draughtsman, painter, collagist, film and video maker, performer, broadcaster and writer with a talent for bringing together disparate media and people. There is certainly a dark side to his work which frequently verges on the repellent but its essential humanity and surreal humour always triumphs. His texts and images weave together the slight with the profound, digging nuggets of gold out of the mud of the everyday. ‘Reassuringly familiar starting points, i.e. clichés, are the deliberately chosen basis of most of my artwork, whether writings, drawings, paintings, films or videotapes. Then the way is clear to test and turn that familiarity into unexpected forms which hopefully disturb complacency.

Breakwell died exactly ten years ago, aged 62. This exhibition commemorates the anniversary with an exhibition of one work for every year of his professional career, a selection of 40 pieces that mark the years 1965 to 2005 and are laid out chronologically in an expanded diary form that is characteristic of so much of his work. Each work, while fascinating in itself, offers a inviting doorway into an oeuvre loaded with riches. An exceptional artist in any medium he handled, it is Breakwell’s mastery of the word, written, spoken and depicted, the word as a visual stimulus, a partner in image-making that sets him apart.

On the occasions when no words appear in the work, for example in the sublime and deeply moving video installation, The Other Side (Tate Collection), there is still a story to be told; or remembered; or imagined.

Breakwell was a member of the Artists Placement Group during the 1970s and his work features in the current exhibition Context Is Half the Work, at Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin. Fully engaged with filmand performance in the late 1960s, his work UNWORD (with Mike Leggett) deployed a revolutionary interweaving of media, staged at the ICA in 1970. He was a contributor to the seminal Video Show at the Serpentine Gallery in 1975 and was the subject of a major exhibition at the ICA in 1977. That show featured Ian Breakwell’s Continuous Diary, a masterpiece of immense proportions covering the years 1969 to 1976 and the most substantial representation of the diary form which always permeated his work. A Cambridge University residency in 1980 led to a major series of large-scale works on paper, 120 Days, which were exhibited in a solo exhibition at the Tate Gallery in 1982 and at the legendary GaleriaFernando Vijande in Madrid, the city of Goya, Breakwell’s high priest. A televised 26 programme series of Ian Breakwell’s Diaries was commissioned for Channel 4 in 1984. Recently there have been major survey exhibitions at Quad in Derby (2010) and the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill (2012/13). Ian Breakwell’s diaries have featured in many publications over the past 40 years.

Many of Breakwell’s works are in important public collections, including those of Tate Gallery, The British Council, Arts Council England, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Australia, and MoMA New York. A DVD anthology of his film work is available from the British Film Institute. The Estate of Ian Breakwell is represented exclusively by Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London

JOHN STEZAKER
Presented by The Approach


11 September – 24 October 2015

STEZAKER

Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

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Installation view 'The Droste Effect', Independent Régence, 2016
Courtesy of Independent Regence, Brussels, and Nature Morte, New Delhi
Photo: Isabelle Arthuis

The Approach in association with Independent Régence is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition in Belgium by British artist John Stezaker. Stezaker has been influential to a number of developments in art over the last three decades, from Conceptual art to Appropriation art, through to the re-emergence of collage. Using found photographs and printed material, Stezaker's collages involve various interventions such as excisions, maskings, cuts, rotations and visual concordances. Juxtaposing disparate sources, his work creates compelling new images. The writer and curator Michael Bracewell recently wrote, “Disquieting, poetic, compelling, romantic, inscrutable, glamorous and strange, Stezaker's re-arrangement and intervention into the virtually infinite resource of mass imagery con ates aesthetics, psychology, cultural and visual theory. In this his work resembles nothing less than a visual encyclopaedia of human consciousness

a 'lectio divina' of semiotics, creating both new experiences of looking and seeing, and enabling renewed understanding of artists and thinkers as diverse as Baudelaire, Jung and Warhol.”

For the solo exhibition at Independent Régence, Stezaker will show for the first time a combination of collages and found objects. Hands of figures in historic film stills and actors’ promotional material feature in many of Stezaker’s collages, a part of the human body often seen but rarely considered.

Using discarded hands from display mannequins as his sculptural subject matter, Stezaker reappropriates their original use and function by presenting them in a new, revised context. Here both found image and object engage in a sensory interplay, exploring touch as a visual motif.